KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2020

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference gathers adopters and technologists from leading open source and cloud native communities virtually from November 17 – 20, 2020. Join Kubernetes, Prometheus, Envoy, CoreDNS, containerd, Fluentd, Jaeger, Vitess, TUF, OpenTracing, gRPC, CNI, Notary, NATS, Linkerd, Helm, Rook, Harbor, etcd, Open Policy Agent, CRI-O, TiKV, CloudEvents, Falco, Argo, Dragonfly, SPIFFE and SPIRE as the community gathers for four days to further the education and advancement of cloud native computing.

Want to be part of our KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2020 coverage?  Email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to find out how to be a sponsor.

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2020 goes digital.  Will you be in attendance?  If the event were physical, we would have looked forward to visiting with Infoblox.  So we reached out to them digitally instead.

Read this exclusive pre-show interview between VMblog and PG Menon, Senior Director of Product Marketing at Infoblox, a company which delivers a next level network experience with its Secure Cloud-Managed Network Services.

2017 was a turning point for container orchestration, as other contenders for container orchestration winner waved the white flag and announced support for Kubernetes. Kubernetes as next-gen infrastructure not only abstracts out compute, storage, and network for container workloads, but also provides many features traditionally only offered in PaaS platforms, such as automated deployment, scaling, load balancing, logging and monitoring of container based application workloads. This, plus Kubernetes' maintenance of desired state against a declarative model makes the application developer and operator's lives a lot easier.

There's something about testing that seems to attract analogies. Everywhere you go, every presentation you watch, someone is talking about how similar testing is to this, or how much testing reminds them of that. Now, if I say that with a twinge of negativity in my voice, it's because the most popular of those analogies also happens to be my least favorite: the mountain top.

It isn't even just testing; chances are you've seen or heard someone talk about how some task is analogous to climbing a mountain, with imagery of needing to cross a hazardous chasm and overcome obstacles before eventually reaching the mountain top and achieving victory.

Here's the problem with that analogy, though, and it's kind of a big problem: there's often no mountain top, especially not in testing. If you're doing it right, testing is a continuous activity. There's no end state; no ultimate achievement that renders your work complete. There's nothing you can do or accomplish today that can't conceivably be undone by something released tomorrow.

Remember, effective automated testing is essentially about avoiding the risky and the unpredictable. In that sense, the mountain top isn't just the wrong analogy for testing, it's the antithesis of what testers should strive to achieve. Let's agree to ditch the mountain once and for all, and instead, focus on finding what I call the Valley of Success. (Credit where credit is due: Rico Mariani first coined a similar term - The Pit of Success - when discussing the development of low-level software code in the early 2000s.)

The Valley of Success is about sustainability, flexibility, and repeatability. It's the place where testers have the reliability and equilibrium they need to make the best possible decisions in the name of making the most possible progress while incurring the least possible cost. The Valley of Success is where effective automated testing happens. Let's examine four key strategies testers can implement to help them get there.

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2020 goes digital.  Will you be in attendance?  If the event were physical, we would have looked forward to visiting with Hammerspace.  So we reached out to them digitally instead.

Read this exclusive pre-show interview between VMblog and Trip Hunter, SVP of Corporate Marketing at Hammerspace, the software-defined hybrid cloud file storage company.

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2020 goes digital.  Will you be in attendance?  If the event were physical, we would have looked forward to visiting with Spectro Cloud.  So we reached out to them digitally instead.

Read this exclusive pre-show interview between VMblog and Tina Nolte, VP Product at Spectro Cloud, an enterprise cloud-native infrastructure company that makes Kubernetes manageable at scale for enterprises that need superior control and flexibility.

Background

Kubernetes understood its limitations and, therefore, left storage out. Provisioning compute is a distinctly different discipline than provisioning storage. Kubernetes introduced the notion of Persistent Volumes (PV) and Persistent Volume Claims (PVC) to manage the challenge of providing persistent storage to non-persistent applications, such as Kubernetes Pods. They are APIs that decouple the what from the how or, in other words, consumption from implementation details. It is a highly useful disaggregation that turns infrastructure into reusable storage pools for Kubernetes Pods. 

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